So What About The Law [Radio Broadcast February 2017]

“So what about that law?” Radio Show

Sunday 10:30 AM WATD 95.9 FM

Lois Drukman, my insurance broker, and the show’s Health, Auto and Home Insurance expert co hosted. We discussed the law as it relates to insurance.

CLICK HERE TO LISTEN

 

If you are in need of an insurance agent or are looking to find out what your insurance options are for your home, auto, health or business please contact me.

Lois Drukman
Independent Insurance Broker
Walter J. May Insurance Agency Inc., Hingham, MA
Direct: 781-740-5421 Cell: 617-827-6848
Email: ldrukman@waltermayinsurance.com

Christmas Safety Tips

The Christmas season is here, one of the most joyous times of the year. It’s the season for family gatherings, decorations and making memories. Unfortunately, it is also the season for fires and accidents – the majority of which can be prevented by following some simple Christmas safety tips.

According to the National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA), December has one of the highest number of house fires. Each Christmas season, some 400 house fires in the US are sparked by holiday decorations resulting in $15 million in property damage. Also, the Electrical Safety Foundation reports that there are some 5,800 injuries each December from falls while people are placing rooftop decorations on their homes.

Here are some Christmas safety tips to keep you, your family, and your home safe during the holiday season.

Christmas trees – There’s nothing like the look and scent of a real Christmas tree as the centerpiece of your home decorations. Real trees, however, can be a fire hazard risk and require care. When selecting a real tree, make sure it is fresh and green and the needles do not fall off when touched. About two inches should be cut from the bottom of the trunk. Water should be added daily to the tree stand to provide moisture.

A dried-out tree is like having a can of gasoline sitting in your living room. If it catches fire, flames can spread very quickly. The NFPA reports that 230 house fires were caused by Christmas trees each year between 2007 and 2011.

The tree should be at least three feet away from any heat source such as a fireplace, stove, radiator or vent. Never place candles on a real tree. Use only Underwriters Laboratory (UL) approved lights. Make sure the lights and cords are not damaged. One of every three house fires caused by a Christmas tree is related to an electrical problem.

Lights – Holiday lights should not be used for more than three seasons since they are delicate and can damage easily. Do not use more than three sets of push-in bulb strings together. You should also not use more than 50 screw-in bulb strings together. Check the cords for fraying or damage. Also, check the conditions of the bulbs. As mentioned, make sure the light sets are UL approved. Turn off the lights when leaving your home or going to bed.

Candles – Although real candles can set a mood, they can be dangerous. December is the prime month for candle-related fires. Never leave candles unattended in a room or place them near anything combustible. Place candles on a non-flammable and heat-resistant surface or plate. According to the NFPA, 56% of candle-related house fires are the result of candles being too close to another object.

Extension cords – Never run an extension cord under a rug and make sure it is placed away from where people walk to avoid a tripping hazard. Check the condition of the cord before using it. Make sure the cord is UL approved. Do not overload electrical outlets.

Children and pets – Holiday decorations draw the attention of both children and pets. While adding to the festive ambiance of your home, decorations can be a hazard for your child or pet. Poinsettias, holly and mistletoe are poisonous if ingested. Symptoms of poisoning from these plants include rashes and nausea. If your child exhibits these symptoms, call the National Poison Center at 800-222-1222. Pets can also show similar symptoms and should be taken to a veterinarian immediately.

Drink responsibly – The Christmas season is the time for parties. Consider having a designated driver or limit your alcohol intake.

Following these Christmas safety tips will make your Christmas a merry one!

 

 

 

 

So What About The Law [Radio Broadcast December 2016]

“So what about that law?” Radio Show

Sunday 10:30 AM WATD 95.9 FM

Lois Drukman, my insurance broker, and the show’s Health, Auto and Home Insurance expert co hosted. We discussed the law as it relates to insurance.

CLICK HERE TO LISTEN

 

If you are in need of an insurance agent or are looking to find out what your insurance options are for your home, auto, health or business please contact me.

Lois Drukman
Independent Insurance Broker
Walter J. May Insurance Agency Inc., Hingham, MA
Direct: 781-740-5421 Cell: 617-827-6848
Email: ldrukman@waltermayinsurance.com

Homeowner Halloween Safety Tips

Homeowner Halloween safety tips

happy halloweenHalloween time is here, and, although it’s a fun day, it can pose risks to homeowners, children and pets. Check with your insurance agent to make sure your homeowners policy has the proper coverage to protect you and your property. Here are some tips to keep everyone safe and avoid insurance claims and even lawsuits.

It’s up to the homeowner to keep their property safe when welcoming the ghosts and goblins to the front door. Make sure your outside lights are on and the walkway and stairs are clear of any obstacles such as flower pots, ornaments, and wet leaves. This will avoid trips and falls and protect you against any liability claims on your homeowner’s insurance policy.

Serve only pre-packaged candy or fruit. If you are having a Halloween party, remember you are responsible for your guests when it comes to serving alcohol. Do not allow anyone under the legal drinking age to consume alcoholic beverages and be aware of anyone drinking excessively.
Do not use candles in Jack-o-Lanterns or in your home. These can easily be knocked over and cause a fire. Children should not carry candles, even in a Jack-o-Lantern. Use battery-powered candles, flashlights or light sticks.

Use caution when carving pumpkins. This activity should be supervised by an older child or an adult. A pumpkin cutter is the safest tool to use instead of a knife.

If you are stepping out for Halloween, tell your neighbors. Keep lights on inside and out. This will deter not only burglars but vandals as well.

Halloween is not usually a fun time for pets, particularly dogs and cats. They can become frightened or overly excited by the constant ringing of the doorbell, the commotion of you running back and forth to the front door and the voices of the children. Even the strange looking costumes can hype up a dog or cat.

Keep your pets, particularly dogs and cats, away from trick-or-treaters. This not only keeps your guests safe, but your pets as well. A dog that is frightened or feels threatened can bite – it’s their nature, no matter how docile or well-behaved you may think they may be. A dog bite can lead to a claim on your homeowners insurance policy or a lawsuit.

It’s best to keep pets in another room during trick-or-treat hours. Put them in a crate with a towel or blanket over it. Give them their favorite toy and some treats. Also, play some soft music to help drown out the noise from the youngsters.

Don’t leave your pet in a car or outside alone during trick-or-treat hours. They can become easily frightened and anxious if left alone in a car from the noise and strange sights. This can lead to your pet damaging the inside of the vehicle. Also, there have been instances of pets being injured, teased, stolen, and even killed on Halloween when left unattended outside.

If you want your dog to be part of the Halloween fun, there are costumes just for pets. Make sure your dog can tolerate it and that it is not too tight or loose and cumbersome. There are Halloween collars, bandanas and full costumes available for dogs. Be careful nothing on the costume can become a choking hazard. Additionally, make sure parts of the costume can’t become caught on anything.

Your dog’s costume have some reflective stripes if you’re planning on taking him or her trick-or-treating. Make sure you have your dog’s identification tag on its collar. Those strange looking costumed children passing you by on the street could frighten your pet and he or she may try to run off. Should your dog get away from you, it would be easier to find it with the ID tag. Consider getting a microchip implanted in your dog or cat. It allows your pet to be easily tracked down.

Many pet shops sell Halloween treats for pets. Do not give your dog or cat chocolate. A substance in chocolate, the bromine, is toxic to pets. Candy, in general, is not good for your pet since it can cause upset stomachs. Be careful not to leave wrappers around for your pet to consume. These can lead to choking or intestinal blockages. Don’t leave candy lying around where you pet can easily access it. Halloween decorative corn and pumpkins are usually non-toxic but can cause stomach irritation if consumed.

Have fun on Halloween, but make it safe.

If you are in need of an insurance agent or are looking to find out what your insurance options are for your home, auto, health or business please contact me.

Lois Drukman
Independent Insurance Broker
Walter J. May Insurance Agency Inc., Hingham, MA
Direct: 781-740-5421 Cell: 617-827-6848
Email: ldrukman@waltermayinsurance.com

#HappyHalloween  #SSNPG

So What About The Law [Radio Broadcast September 2016]

“So what about that law?” Radio Show

Sunday 10:30 AM WATD 95.9 FM

Lois Drukman, my insurance broker, and the show’s Health, Auto and Home Insurance expert co hosted. We discussed the law as it relates to insurance.

CLICK HERE TO LISTEN

If you are in need of an insurance agent or are looking to find out what your insurance options are for your home, auto, health or business please contact me.

Lois Drukman
Independent Insurance Broker
Walter J. May Insurance Agency Inc., Hingham, MA
Direct: 781-740-5421 Cell: 617-827-6848
Email: ldrukman@waltermayinsurance.com

Safe Driving Tips for Memorial Day

Memorial Day weekend kicks off the summer vacation season and is typically the busiest for traffic where millions of families hit the road. More traffic means more chances of accidents. In 2012, the holiday weekend claimed more than 370 lives on the roads as a result of crashes, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).

The American Red Cross and NHTSA offer these safe driving tips to help protect you and your family while traveling.

  1. Stay alert – Give your full attention to the road. Avoid distractions such as cell phones. Drink water to avoid dehydration.
  2. Buckle Up – Everyone in your vehicle must agree to wear their seatbelts every time they are riding or driving with you. Wearing a seatbelt is also the best defense against a drunk-driving related crash. Make sure children’s car and booster seats are properly installed.
  3. Rest up – Get plenty of rest before you begin your adventure. It will help you stay more alert.
  4. Allow extra travel time – Expect delays and leave early for your destination in order to avoid being frustrated by congested roads. Frustration leads to aggressive driving that can result in a crash. Don’t run yellow or red lights and leave plenty of room behind the vehicles you’re following.
  5. Avoid alcohol – Alcohol and driving can be a deadly mix. It reduces your reflexes and cognitive actions. Every day, nearly 30 people in the U.S. die in an alcohol-related crash.
  6. Make frequent stops – This helps avoid fatigue and keeps you more alert. Have a snack or a light lunch during the stop. Stretch your legs and walk around a bit.
  7. Check your tires – Improperly inflated tires can lead to a blowout, especially driving for long period of time on a hot road. Check the placard on your vehicle driver’s door for the proper inflation rate. Also, check the condition and inflation of your spare tire.
  8. Keep it clean – Make sure your windshield and lights are clean. Not only can the outside of the windshield get dirty, so does the inside where a cloudy haze often forms and can impede night vision. Take a roll of paper towels and window cleaner with you.
  9. Use caution in work zones – There are many road construction projects underway. Speed limits are usually reduced in these zones. Also, remember the “Move Over Law.” If you see a police cruiser stopped at the side of the highway, you are required to move over to the next lane.
  10. Don’t leave kids unattended – Even if you’re running into a store for just a few minutes, children should never be left alone in a vehicle.
  11. Keep an eye on the gas gauge – Don’t let your gas tank get too low. There are some areas where gas stations can be many miles apart. A good rule of thumb is not to let the gauge go below half.

Many families take their pets with them. Consider your pet’s age and health before taking him or her along for the ride. If you do take your pet with you, make sure you bring food and bowls, a leash, and medication. It’s also a good idea to bring along a picture of your pet in case it gets loose.

Being properly prepared for the long holiday weekend trip can make it not only fun, but safe.

If you are in need of an insurance agent or are looking to find out what your insurance options are for your home, auto, health or business please contact me.

Lois Drukman
Independent Insurance Broker
Walter J. May Insurance Agency Inc., Hingham, MA
Direct: 781-740-5421 Cell: 617-827-6848
Email: ldrukman@waltermayinsurance.com

So What About The Law [Radio Broadcast April 2016]

“So what about that law?” Radio Show

Sunday 10:30 AM WATD 95.9 FM

April 3rd, 2016:    Lois Drukman , the shows expert on insurance and I discussed the importance of :naming a Health Care Agent, having life insurance and helpful tips to reduce your insurance premiums.

CLICK HERE TO LISTEN

 

 

So What About The Law [Radio Broadcast January 2016]

Latest Radio Broadcast

“So what about that law?” Radio Show

Sunday 10:30 AM WATD 95.9 FM

January 3, 2016:     Lois Drukman, Home, Auto, Health Insurance Agent,  co hosted the show and we discussed how to avoid penalties for not having health insurance and how to save some money on your health insurance options.

Here’s the link to listen…

https://soundcloud.com/sowhataboutthatlaw/so-what-about-that-law-january-3-2016

Holiday Safety Tips

The holiday season is the most joyous of the year but, sadly, can also be the most tragic. A large number of house fires occur during December, mostly related to holiday decorations. According to the National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA), home holiday decorations cause over 400 house fires and $15 million in property damage and loss annually. Additionally, some 5,800 injuries occur each year from falls while people are placing rooftop decorations on their homes, according to the Electrical Safety Foundation International.

Here are some tips to keep you, your family, and your home safe during the holiday season.

Christmas trees – Many families prefer real trees for their home for Christmas because of their natural look and fragrance. Real trees, however, require care. When selecting a real tree, make sure the needles are fresh and green and do not fall off when touched. About two inches should be cut from the bottom of the trunk. Water should be added daily to the tree stand to provide moisture. A dried out tree is like having a can of gasoline sitting in your living room.

The tree should not be placed near any heat source such as a fireplace, stove, radiator or vent. Never use candles on a real tree. Use only Underwriters Laboratory approved lights. Make sure the lights and cords are not damaged. One of every three house fires caused by a Christmas tree is related to an electrical problem. The NFPA reports that one of every 31 house fires sparked by a Christmas tree results in death compared to one in every 144 house fires.

Lights – Holiday lights should not be used for more than three seasons since they are delicate and can damage easily. Do not use more than three sets of push-in bulb strings together. You should also not use more than 50 screw-in bulb strings together. Check the cords for fraying or damage. Also, check the conditions of the bulbs. Do not overload electrical outlets or extension cords. Never run an electrical cord under a rug. Turn off the lights when leaving your home or going to bed.

Candles – Although real candles can set a mood, they can be dangerous. December is the prime month for candle-related fires. Never leave candles unattended in a room or place them near anything combustible. Place candles on non-flammable and heat-resistant surface or plate. According to the NFPA, 56 percent of candle-related house fires are the result of candles being too close to another object.

Children and pets – Holiday decorations draw the attention of both children and pets. While adding to the festive ambiance of your home, decorations can be a hazard for your child or pet. Poinsettias, holly and mistletoe are poisonous if ingested. Symptoms of poisoning from these plants include rashes and nausea. If your child exhibits these symptoms, call the National Poison Center at 800-222-1222. Pets can also show similar symptoms and should be taken to a veterinarian immediately. Also, never let your child handle electrical extension cords since most contain lead that can rub off on hands. Wash hands after handling electrical cords. Tinsel, small toys, and decorations pose choking hazards. It’s best to keep an eye on your child or pet when these near objects.

Following these holiday safety tips will make your holidays memorable – in a good way!

If you are in need of an insurance agent or are looking to find out what your insurance options are for your home, auto, health or business please contact me.

Lois Drukman
Independent Insurance Broker
Walter J. May Insurance Agency Inc., Hingham, MA
Direct: 781-740-5421 Cell: 617-827-6848
Email: ldrukman@waltermayinsurance.com